The Good War

The Good War

Author: Jack Fairweather

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781448139729

Category: History

Page: 528

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A timely lesson in the perils of nation-building and a sobering reminder of the limits of military power from the Costa Award winning author of The Volunteer. In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph - a ‘good war’ in comparison to the debacle in Iraq. It has since turned into one of the longest and most expensive wars in recent history. The story of how this good war went so bad may well turn out to be a defining tragedy of the twenty-first century - yet, as acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather explains, it should also give us reason to hope for an outcome grounded in Afghan reality. In The Good War, Fairweather provides the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan, from the 2001 invasion to the 2014 withdrawal. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, previously unpublished archives, and months of experience living and reporting in Afghanistan, Fairweather traces the course of the conflict from its inception after 9/11 to the drawdown in 2014. In the process, he explores the righteous intentions and astounding hubris that caused the West’s strategy in Afghanistan to flounder, refuting the long-held notion that the war could have been won with more troops and cash. Fairweather argues that only by accepting the limitations in Afghanistan - from the presence of the Taliban to the ubiquity of poppy production to the country’s inherent unsuitability for rapid, Western-style development - can we help to restore peace in this shattered land. The Good War leads readers from the White House Situation Room to Afghan military outposts, from warlords’ palaces to insurgents’ dens, to explain how the US and its British allies might have salvaged the Afghan campaign - and how we must rethink other ‘good’ wars in the future.
The Good War
Language: en
Pages: 528
Authors: Jack Fairweather
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12-03 - Publisher: Random House

A timely lesson in the perils of nation-building and a sobering reminder of the limits of military power from the Costa Award winning author of The Volunteer. In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph - a ‘good war’ in comparison to the debacle
Nation-building Unraveled?
Language: en
Pages: 236
Authors: Antonio Donini, Norah Niland, Karin Wermester
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Kumarian Press

*Uses Afghanistan as a case-study that can be applied internationally *Contributors have direct political and human rights experience in the field The prevailing wisdom about post-conflict reconstruction is centered on the notion of nation-building. In the globalized post-September 11th world, can military might and technological solutions foster stability by enforcing
Hoping for Peace in Afghanistan
Language: en
Pages: 48
Authors: Nick Hunter
Categories: Afghan War, 2001-
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-06 - Publisher: Raintree

If two children from both sides of a conflict could write to each other, what would they say? This hard-hitting but heart-warming book tells of war and conflict in Afghanistan over the past ten years through the eyes of two fictional children who are corresponding by letter, as penpals. One
Afghanistan from the Cold War through the War on Terror
Language: en
Pages: 528
Authors: Barnett R. Rubin
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-03-15 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

One of our foremost authorities on modern Afghanistan, Barnett R. Rubin has dedicated much of his career to the study of this remote mountain country. He served as a special advisor to the late Ambassador Richard Holbrooke during his final mission to the region and still serves the Obama administration
Constitutional Issues in the Afghan Peace Negotiations
Language: en
Pages: 23
Authors: Barnett R. Rubin
Categories: Afghanistan
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher:

The peace negotiations between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban that began in September in Doha, Qatar, will almost certainly include revisiting the country's constitution. Both sides claim to abide by Islamic law, but they interpret it in very different ways. This report examines some of the constitutional