Autobiography of Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet

Autobiography of Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852750

Category: History

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Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet was a major figure during the early years of the New Kingdom, who, like his contemporary Ahmose Pen-Ebana, appears to have been from the city of El Kab, where his tomb was found. His autobiography is much shorter than Pen-Ebana’s autobiography, however, is also far more damaged. This translation follows the general reconstruction that most Egyptologists agree on, however, sections of the original text may have been lost entirely before it was rediscovered in the late-1800s. Like Pen-Ebana, he served a series of kings, starting with Ahmose I, and continuing through Amenhotep I, Thutmose II, Hatshepsut, and finally Thutmose III, meaning he served for decades longer than Ahmose Pen-Ebana. This difference in length of service is likely due to his higher position within Egyptian society, already reportedly the herald of the king at a battle in Djahy, which may have been the Battle of Sharuhen. Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet’s autobiography does not mention the Battle of Avaris, which had taken place a few years earlier, implying he became the king’s herald after the Hyksos dynasty lost Avaris. Egyptologists debate what exactly Pen-Nekhbet meant by Djahy, and some believe King Ahmose I may have marched his army north from Sharuhen through southern Canaan to restore order in the region, however, there is no corroborating evidence of this known, and there is no reason to assume he wasn’t talking about Sharuhen, as Sharuhen was in Djahy, the ancient Egyptian name for southern Canaan. Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet then mentioned serving King Amenhotep I in the campaigns in Kush, where he captured slaves, like Ahmose Pen-Ebana. Unlike Pen-Ebana, however, Pen-Nekhbet only mentioned one campaign in Kush, which implies that he did not partake in most of the campaigns in Nubia unless those stories were lost in the damaged sections. Pen-Nekhbet’s story also includes a reference to a campaign against what appear to be the Berber tribes of the Sahara. He referred to a campaign against the Iamu-Kehek, which includes the name Kehek, a Libyan tribe later mentioned during the reign of Ramesses III, circa 1188 BC. The Thebans are recorded to having occupied the five oases of the western desert during their war against the Hyksos, including the Kharga Oasis, Dakhla Oasis, now dry Farafra depression, Bahariya Oasis, and the Fayyum. This reference to the Iamu-Kehek implies the army of Amenhotep I pushed west through the Sahara desert, likely to Siwa Oasis, where an ancient oracle temple of Amen existed by the 10th century BC.
Autobiography of Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Scriptural Research Institute
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-13 - Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet was a major figure during the early years of the New Kingdom, who, like his contemporary Ahmose Pen-Ebana, appears to have been from the city of El Kab, where his tomb was found. His autobiography is much shorter than Pen-Ebana’s autobiography, however, is also far more damaged. This
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Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: Robert Steven Bianchi
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

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Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Scriptural Research Institute
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-03 - Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

The New Kingdom era of Egyptian history emerged from the darkness of the Second Intermediate Period, when the Theban dynasty drove out the Hyksos from Egypt, and went on the conquer Canaan, and Nubia. The Hyksos dynasty appears to have been largely as a result of the Minoan eruption in
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Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Scriptural Research Institute
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-13 - Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

Thutmose II was the king of Egypt between approximately 1493 and 1479 BC, after inheriting the throne from his father Thutmose I. It is believed he was 17 years old when his father died, and he became king, however, did not partake in the expedition to Kush to suppress the
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Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Scriptural Research Institute
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-08-30 - Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

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