Battlecruiser Repulse

Battlecruiser Repulse

Author: John Roberts

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781526757296

Category: History

Page: 152

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The technical details of British warships were recorded in a set of plans produced by the builders on completion of every ship. Known as the ‘as fitted’ general arrangements, these drawings represented the exact appearance and fitting of the ship as it entered service. Intended to provide a permanent reference for the Admiralty and the dockyards, these highly detailed plans were drawn with exquisite skill in multi-colored inks and washes that represent the acme of the draughtsman’s art. Today they form part of the incomparable collection of the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, which is using the latest scanning technology to make digital copies of the highest quality. This book is one of a series based entirely on these draughts which depict famous warships in an unprecedented degree of detail – complete sets in full color, with many close-ups and enlargements that make every aspect clear and comprehensible. Extensive captions point the reader to important features to be found in the plans, and an introduction covers the background to the design. The subject of this volume was one of the last battlecruisers, elegant ships which combined a powerful armament with high speed, but much criticised for their light protection. Throughout their existence, they were controversial – three were sunk at Jutland – and 'Repulse' herself was famously lost to Japanese air attack at the outset of the Pacific War. Nevertheless, the type was highly prized: 'Repulse' and her sister 'Renown' were the only capital ships given sufficient priority to be designed, built and completed during the course of the First World War, and substantial sums were spent on large-scale reconstruction during the 1930s. Both of these phases of the ship’s life are fully documented in two separate sets of plans, which allow this novel form of anatomy to cover the whole life of the ship.
Battlecruiser Repulse
Language: en
Pages: 152
Authors: John Roberts
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-06-30 - Publisher: Pen and Sword

The technical details of British warships were recorded in a set of plans produced by the builders on completion of every ship. Known as the ‘as fitted’ general arrangements, these drawings represented the exact appearance and fitting of the ship as it entered service. Intended to provide a permanent reference
Sinking Force Z 1941
Language: en
Pages: 96
Authors: Angus Konstam
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-01-21 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

In late 1941, war was looming with Japan, and Britain's empire in southeast Asia was at risk. The British government decided to send Force Z, which included the state-of-the-art battleship Prince of Wales and the battlecruiser Repulse, to bolster the naval defences of Singapore, and provide a mighty naval deterrent
The Battlecruiser HMS HOOD
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Bruce Taylor
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-04-30 - Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

The battlecruiser HMS Hood is one of the great warships of history. Unmatched for beauty, unequalled for size, for twenty years the Hood was the glory ship of the Royal Navy, flying the flag across the world in the twilight years of the British Empire. Here, in words, photos and
The Encyclopedia of Codenames of World War II (Routledge Revivals)
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: Christopher Chant
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-18 - Publisher: Routledge

Codenames were a vital feature of World War II, serving as mental shorthand for those in the know, and obscuring the issues for those who were not. Codenames were used from the highest level, in the planning of grand strategic moves affecting the conduct of the whole war, to the
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Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: H.G. Weaver, H.J. Weaver
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-09-28 - Publisher: Birlinn

Sinking the battleship HMS Royal Oak in the Royal Navy's home anchorage, with the loss of more than 800 of her crew, was Germany's first shattering blow against Britain in the 1939-45 war. Within six weeks the long-standing German dream of breaching the defences of Scapa Flow had been achieved.