Death, Disability, and the Superhero

Death, Disability, and the Superhero

Author: José Alaniz

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781626743274

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 376

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The Thing. Daredevil. Captain Marvel. The Human Fly. Drawing on DC and Marvel comics from the 1950s to the 1990s and marshaling insights from three burgeoning fields of inquiry in the humanities—disability studies, death and dying studies, and comics studies—José Alaniz seeks to redefine the contemporary understanding of the superhero. Beginning in the Silver Age, the genre increasingly challenged and complicated its hypermasculine, quasi-eugenicist biases through such disabled figures as Ben Grimm/The Thing, Matt Murdock/Daredevil, and the Doom Patrol. Alaniz traces how the superhero became increasingly vulnerable, ill, and mortal in this era. He then proceeds to a reinterpretation of characters and series—some familiar (Superman), some obscure (She-Thing). These genre changes reflected a wider awareness of related body issues in the postwar United States as represented by hospice, death with dignity, and disability rights movements. The persistent highlighting of the body’s “imperfection” comes to forge a predominant aspect of the superheroic self. Such moves, originally part of the Silver Age strategy to stimulate sympathy, enhance psychological depth, and raise the dramatic stakes, developed further in such later series as The Human Fly, Strikeforce: Morituri, and the landmark graphic novel The Death of Captain Marvel, all examined in this volume. Death and disability, presumed routinely absent or denied in the superhero genre, emerge to form a core theme and defining function of the Silver Age and beyond.
Death, Disability, and the Superhero
Language: en
Pages: 376
Authors: José Alaniz
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-10-15 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

The Thing. Daredevil. Captain Marvel. The Human Fly. Drawing on DC and Marvel comics from the 1950s to the 1990s and marshaling insights from three burgeoning fields of inquiry in the humanities—disability studies, death and dying studies, and comics studies—José Alaniz seeks to redefine the contemporary understanding of the superhero.
Comics and Graphic Novels
Language: en
Pages: 345
Authors: Julia Round, Rikke Platz Cortsen, Maaheen Ahmed
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-09-22 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Providing an overview of the dynamic field of comics and graphic novels for students and researchers, this Essential Guide contextualises the major research trends, debates and ideas that have emerged in Comics Studies over the past decades. Interdisciplinary and international in its scope, the critical approaches on offer spread across
Disability and the Environment in American Literature
Language: en
Pages: 186
Authors: Matthew J. C. Cella
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-12 - Publisher: Lexington Books

The essays in Disability and the Environment in American Literature contribute new insights into the fields of literary disability studies and ecocriticism by placing the two fields in dialogue. The book offers readings of American literary narratives of place that expose the deep relationship between embodiment and emplacement and that
Superheroes and Excess
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Jamie Brassett, Richard Reynolds
Categories: Comics & Graphic Novels
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-30 - Publisher: Routledge

Finding the superhero genre in need of further investigation from philosophical standpoints that value excess as a creative drive, rather than denigrate it as a problem to be resolved, this book opens up discussions that highlight different approaches to ‘the creative excess of being’ as expressed through the genre. While
Superheroes and Critical Animal Studies
Language: en
Pages: 206
Authors: J.L. Schatz, Sean Parson
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-12-20 - Publisher: Lexington Books

This book brings together comic studies and critical animal studies to provide a critical media analysis that centralizes total liberation for all beings—both human and nonhuman. Through the lens of superheroes, the book explores the cultural and literal consumption of nonhumans as a strategy for confronting humanism at large.