Dividing Lines

Dividing Lines

Author: Andreá N Williams

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472118618

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

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Dividing Lines is one of the most extensive studies of class in nineteenth-century African American literature. Clear and engaging, this book unveils how black fiction writers represented the uneasy relationship between class differences, racial solidarity, and the quest for civil rights in black communities. By portraying complex, highly stratified communities with a growing black middle class, these authors dispelled popular notions that black Americans were uniformly poor or uncivilized. But even as the writers highlighted middle-class achievement, they worried over whether class distinctions would help or sabotage collective black protest against racial prejudice. Andreá N. Williams argues that the signs of class anxiety are embedded in postbellum fiction: from the verbal stammer or prim speech of class-conscious characters to fissures in the fiction's form. In these telling moments, authors innovatively dared to address the sensitive topic of class differences—a topic inextricably related to American civil rights and social opportunity. Williams delves into the familiar and lesser-known works of Frances E. W. Harper, Pauline Hopkins, Charles W. Chesnutt, Sutton Griggs, and Paul Laurence Dunbar, showing how these texts mediate class through discussions of labor, moral respectability, ancestry, spatial boundaries, and skin complexion. Dividing Lines also draws on reader responses—from book reviews, editorials, and letters—to show how the class anxiety expressed in African American fiction directly sparked reader concerns over the status of black Americans in the U.S. social order. Weaving literary history with compelling textual analyses, this study yields new insights about the intersection of race and class in black novels and short stories from the 1880s to 1900s.
Dividing Lines
Language: en
Pages: 222
Authors: Andreá N Williams
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-01-02 - Publisher: University of Michigan Press

Dividing Lines is one of the most extensive studies of class in nineteenth-century African American literature. Clear and engaging, this book unveils how black fiction writers represented the uneasy relationship between class differences, racial solidarity, and the quest for civil rights in black communities. By portraying complex, highly stratified communities
Dividing Lines
Language: en
Pages: 733
Authors: J. Mills Thornton
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002-09-25 - Publisher: University of Alabama Press

In a definitive overview of the political cultures that existed in Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma, the author takes a new look at the civil rights movement by comparing the social, economic, and political factors of the three cities that led the movement in the 1950s and 1960s.
Dividing Lines
Language: en
Pages: 348
Authors: K.N. Raghavan
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-19 - Publisher: One Point Six Technology Pvt Ltd

The chessboard of Sino-Indian relations, fraught with emotion, diplomatic strategy, military stand-offs and global ambitions, will perhaps be the most keenly watched during the 21st century; certain to send ripples across the world, influence markets and international policy. So where do the fault lines lie in this contest between the
Dividing Lines
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Adrian Caesar
Categories: English poetry
Type: BOOK - Published: 1991 - Publisher: Manchester University Press

Caesar (English, U. of New South Wales) argues against the centrality of Auden in the milieu of British poets during the 1930s and describes a heterogeneity of ideology, style, class origin, and life experience. He reviews the prevailing interpretations of the period, and considers a wide range of major and
Dividing Lines
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Daniel J. Tichenor
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-02-09 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

Immigration is perhaps the most enduring and elemental leitmotif of America. This book is the most powerful study to date of the politics and policies it has inspired, from the founders' earliest efforts to shape American identity to today's revealing struggles over Third World immigration, noncitizen rights, and illegal aliens.