Elastic Filaments of the Cell

Elastic Filaments of the Cell

Author: H.L. Granzier

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461542674

Category: Science

Page: 425

View: 713

Download Now
Elastic filaments refer mainly to titin, the largest of all known proteins. Titin was discovered initially in muscle cells, where it interconnects the thick filament with the Z-line. Titin forms a molecular spring that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of contracting muscle, ensuring efficient muscle contraction. More recently, it has become clear that titin is not restricted to muscle cells alone. For example, titin is found in chromosomes of neurons and also in blood platelets. This topic is fast becoming a focal point for research in understanding viscoelastic properties at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. In titin may lie a generic basis for biological viscoelasticity. It has become clear that titin may hold the key to certain clinical anomalies. For example, it is clear that titin-based ventricular stiffness is modulated by calcium and that titin is responsible for the altered stiffness in cardiomyopathies. It is also clear from evidence from a group of Finnish families that titin mutations may underlie some muscular dystrophies and that with other mutations chromatids fail to separate during mitosis. Thus, it is clear that this protein will have important clinical implications stemming from its biomechanical role. One aspect of this field is the bringing together of bioengineers with clinical researchers and biologists. Genetic and biochemical aspects of titin-related proteins are being studied together with front-line engineering approaches designed to measure the mechanics of titin either in small aggregates or in single molecules.
Elastic Filaments of the Cell
Language: en
Pages: 425
Authors: H.L. Granzier, Gerald H. Pollack
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

Elastic filaments refer mainly to titin, the largest of all known proteins. Titin was discovered initially in muscle cells, where it interconnects the thick filament with the Z-line. Titin forms a molecular spring that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of contracting muscle, ensuring efficient muscle contraction. More recently,
Nature's Versatile Engine:
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Jim Vigoreaux
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-06-24 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

Methods for Obtaining X-Ray Diffraction Patterns from Drosophila 198 Diffraction Patterns from Drosophila IFM 203 Concluding Remarks 211 Note Added in Proof 211 17. Functional and Ecological Effects of Isoform Variation in Insect Flight Muscle 214 James H. Marden Abstract 214 Introduction 215 Nature's Versatile Engine 215 The Underlying Genetics:
Elastomeric Proteins
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Peter R. Shewry, Arthur S. Tatham, Allen J. Bailey
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-10-30 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This book was originally published in 2002. Elastic proteins occur in a wide range of biological systems where they have evolved to fulfil precise biological roles. The best known include proteins in vertebrate muscles and connective tissues, such as titin, elastin and fibrillin, and spider silks. However, other examples include
The Journal of Cell Biology
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Peter R. Shewry, Arthur S. Tatham, Allen J. Bailey
Categories: Biochemistry
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher:

No. 2, pt. 2 of November issue each year from v. 19 (1963)-47 (1970) and v. 55 (1972)- contain the Abstracts of papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology, 3d (1963)-10th (1970) and 12th (1972)-
The Encyclopaedia Britannica
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Peter R. Shewry, Arthur S. Tatham, Allen J. Bailey
Categories: Encyclopedias and dictionaries
Type: BOOK - Published: 1894 - Publisher:

Books about The Encyclopaedia Britannica