Genres and Provenance in the Comedy of W.S. Gilbert

Genres and Provenance in the Comedy of W.S. Gilbert

Author: Richard Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000699890

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 796

Download Now
In The Progress of Fun W.S. Gilbert was considered, not as a ‘classic Victorian’, but as part of an on-going comedic continuum stretching from Aristophanes to Joe Orton and beyond. Pipes and Tabors continues the story, covering the comedic experience differently by reference to genres. Here – treated in relation to a line of significant others – we discover how Gilbert responded to areas such as the Pastoral, the Irish drama, nautical scenarios, melodrama, sensation-theatre, the nonsensemode, pantomime spectaculars, fairy plays, and classical farce. Also included is a wider look at his relation to various European musical forms and (for instance) to the English line of wit and the Elizabethan pamphleteers. To consider a writer not so much by a study of individual works as by threads of linking generic modes tells us a great deal about cultural interconnections and the richly textured nature of theatrical experience. Pipes and Tabors offers a tapestry of overlapping genres and treatments, showing not just the design of the finished products but the shreds and patches which form the underside of the weave. According to Dorothy L. Sayers, life itself offers us the apparent loose ends of a design which will only be revealed from the front after death. In terms of Gilbertian comedy, we are privileged to be able to track both the effort of the weave and the skill of the finished product. On the way we will also discover some new links and sub-text implications about other 19th century denigrated groups which were buried from sight for too long.
Genres and Provenance in the Comedy of W.S. Gilbert
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Richard Moore
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-01 - Publisher: Routledge

In The Progress of Fun W.S. Gilbert was considered, not as a ‘classic Victorian’, but as part of an on-going comedic continuum stretching from Aristophanes to Joe Orton and beyond. Pipes and Tabors continues the story, covering the comedic experience differently by reference to genres. Here – treated in relation
Geography and the Literary Imagination in Victorian Fictions of Empire
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Jean Fernandez
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-02-13 - Publisher: Routledge

In this pioneering study, Dr. Fernandez explores how the rise of institutional geography in Victorian England impacted imperial fiction’s emergence as a genre characterized by a preoccupation with space and place. This volume argues that the alliance between institutional geography and the British empire which commenced with the founding of
The Bohemian Republic
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: James Gatheral
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-30 - Publisher: Routledge

In the mid-nineteenth century successive cultural Bohemias were proclaimed in Paris, London, New York, and Melbourne. Focusing on networks and borders as the central modes of analysis, this book charts for the first time Bohemia’s cross-Channel, transatlantic, and trans-Pacific migrations, locating its creative expressions and social practices within a global
Dickensian Affects
Language: en
Pages: 210
Authors: Joshua Gooch
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-10-08 - Publisher: Routledge

In Dickensian Affects: Charles Dickens and Feelings of Precarity, Joshua Gooch argues that Dickens’s novels offer models of feeling that illuminate the dissensions that accompany life’s precariousness under capitalism. By examining the role of violence, anxiety, surprise, and suspense in Dickens’s novels, Gooch explores how they represent and shape emotions
The Nineteenth Century Revis(it)ed
Language: en
Pages: 266
Authors: Ina Bergmann
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-29 - Publisher: Routledge

The Nineteenth Century Revis(it)ed: The New Historical Fiction explores the renaissance of the American historical novel at the turn of the twenty-first century. The study examines the revision of nineteenth-century historical events in cultural products against the background of recent theoretical trends in American studies. It combines insights of literary