How I Became Hettie Jones

How I Became Hettie Jones

Author: Hettie Jones

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 9780802196781

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 803

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“A thoughtful, intimate memoir of life in the burgeoning movement of new jazz, poetry, and politics . . . in Lower Manhattan in the late 1950s and early 1960s” (Alix Kate Shulman, The Nation). Greenwich Village in the 1950s was a haven to which young poets, painters, and musicians flocked. Among them was Hettie Cohen, who’d been born into a middle-class Jewish family in Queens and who’d chosen to cross racial barriers to marry African American poet LeRoi Jones. This is her reminiscence of life in the awakening East Village in the era of the Beats, Black Power, and bohemia. “As the wife of controversial black playwright-poet LeRoi Jones (now Amiri Baraka), Hettie Cohen, a white Jew from Queens, NY, plunged into the Greenwich Village bohemia of jazz, poetry, leftish politics and underground publishing in the late 1950s. Their life together ended in 1965, partly, she implies, because of separatist pressures on blacks to end their interracial marriages. In this restrained autobiographical mix of introspection and gossip, the author writes of coping with racial prejudice and violence, raising two daughters, and of living in the shadow of her husband. When the couple divorced, she became a children’s book author and poet. The memoir is dotted with glimpses of Allen Ginsberg, Thelonious Monk, Jack Kerouac, Frank O’Hara, Billie Holiday, James Baldwin, Franz Kline, among others.” —Publishers Weekly
How I Became Hettie Jones
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Hettie Jones
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-12-01 - Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

“A thoughtful, intimate memoir of life in the burgeoning movement of new jazz, poetry, and politics . . . in Lower Manhattan in the late 1950s and early 1960s” (Alix Kate Shulman, The Nation). Greenwich Village in the 1950s was a haven to which young poets, painters, and musicians flocked.
Encyclopedia of Beat Literature
Language: en
Pages: 414
Authors: Kurt Hemmer
Categories: American literature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-01 - Publisher: Infobase Publishing

Discusses the literary works and great authors of the Beat Generation.
Not June Cleaver
Language: en
Pages: 411
Authors: June Meyerowitz
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher: Temple University Press

In the popular stereotype of post-World War II America, women abandoned their wartime jobs and contentedly retreated to the home. This work unveils the diversity of postwar women, showing how far women departed from this one-dimensional image.
Women Writers of the Beat Era
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Mary Paniccia Carden
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-04-30 - Publisher: University of Virginia Press

The Beat Generation was a group of writers who rejected cultural standards, experimented with drugs, and celebrated sexual liberation. Starting in the 1950s with works such as Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, Allen Ginsberg’s Howl, and William S. Burroughs’s Naked Lunch, the Beat Generation defined an experimental zeitgeist that endures
Merely Being There Is Not Enough
Language: en
Pages: 196
Authors: Heike Mlakar
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-05 - Publisher: Universal-Publishers

Despite the advent of second wave feminism in the late 1960s, it took more than twenty years before feminist literary criticism started to pay attention to the complex role of women Beat writers. Merely Being There Is Not Enough theorizes the memoirs of Diane di Prima, Joyce Johnson, Hettie Jones,