Irish Modernism and the Global Primitive
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: C. Culleton, Maria McGarrity
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-08 - Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

This book scrutinizes the way modern Irish writers exploited or surrendered to primitivism, and how primitivism functions as an idealized nostalgia for the past as a potential representation of difference and connection.
Irish Modernism and the Global Primitive
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: C. Culleton, Maria McGarrity
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-12-08 - Publisher: Springer

This book scrutinizes the way modern Irish writers exploited or surrendered to primitivism, and how primitivism functions as an idealized nostalgia for the past as a potential representation of difference and connection.
Ireland, Revolution, and the English Modernist Imagination
Language: en
Pages: 241
Authors: Eve Patten
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-07-18 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

This book asks how English authors of the early to mid twentieth-century responded to the nationalist revolution in neighbouring Ireland in their work, and explores this response as an expression of anxieties about, and aspirations within, England itself. Drawing predominantly on novels ofthis period, but also on letters, travelogues, literary
The Evolutions of Modernist Epic
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: Václav Paris
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-01-12 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Explores how modernist national narrative successively reimagined the evolutionary epic from the 1910s to the 1930s.
James Joyce, Urban Planning and Irish Modernism
Language: en
Pages: 243
Authors: L. Lanigan
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-08-08 - Publisher: Springer

Irish writing in the modernist era is often regarded as a largely rural affair, engaging with the city in fleeting, often disparaging ways, with Joyce cast as a defiant exception. This book shows how an urban modernist tradition, responsive to the particular political, social, and cultural conditions of Dublin, emerged