Reinterpreting the Banana Republic

Reinterpreting the Banana Republic

Author: Darío A. Euraque

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807861332

Category: History

Page: 270

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In this new analysis of Honduran social and political development, Dar degreeso Euraque explains why Honduras escaped the pattern of revolution and civil wars suffered by its neighbors Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. Within this comparative framework, he challenges the traditional Banana Republic 'theory' and its assumption that multinational corporations completely controlled state formation in Central America. Instead, he demonstrates how local society in Honduras's North Coast banana-exporting region influenced national political development. According to Euraque, the reformism of the 1970s, which prevented social and political polarization in the 1980s, originated in the local politics of San Pedro Sula and other cities along the North Coast. Moreover, Euraque shows that by the 1960s, the banana-growing areas had become bastions of liberalism, led by local capitalists and organized workers. This regional political culture directly influenced events at the national level, argues Euraque. Specifically, the military coup of 1972 drew its ideology and civilian leaders from the North Coast, and as a result, the new regime was able to successfully channel popular unrest into state-sponsored reform projects. Based on long-ignored sources in Honduran and American archives and on interviews, the book signals a major reinterpretation of modern Honduran history.
Reinterpreting the Banana Republic
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Darío A. Euraque
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-11-09 - Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

In this new analysis of Honduran social and political development, Dar degreeso Euraque explains why Honduras escaped the pattern of revolution and civil wars suffered by its neighbors Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. Within this comparative framework, he challenges the traditional Banana Republic 'theory' and its assumption that multinational corporations
Banana Cultures
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: John Soluri
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-03-09 - Publisher: University of Texas Press

Bananas, the most frequently consumed fresh fruit in the United States, have been linked to Miss Chiquita and Carmen Miranda, "banana republics," and Banana Republic clothing stores—everything from exotic kitsch, to Third World dictatorships, to middle-class fashion. But how did the rise in banana consumption in the United States affect
The Legacies of Liberalism
Language: en
Pages: 396
Authors: James Mahoney
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-06 - Publisher: JHU Press

Winner of the Barrington Moore Jr. Prize for the Best Book in Comparative and Historical Sociology from the American Sociological AssociationWinner of the Best Book Award in the Comparative Democratization Section from the American Political Science Association Despite their many similarities, Central American countries during the twentieth century were characterized
Roots of Resistance
Language: en
Pages: 416
Authors: Suyapa G. Portillo Villeda
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-03-16 - Publisher: University of Texas Press

On May 1, 1954, striking banana workers on the North Coast of Honduras brought the regional economy to a standstill, invigorating the Honduran labor movement and placing a series of demands on the US-controlled banana industry. Their actions ultimately galvanized a broader working-class struggle and reawakened long-suppressed leftist ideals. The
The Oxford Handbook of Central American History
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Robert H. Holden
Categories: Central America
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

"Central America is a region defined primarily by its geographical configuration as a canal-friendly isthmus, and its three-century history as the Spanish Kingdom of Guatemala. Having gained independence in 1821, the Kingdom broke up into the nations of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica after two turbulent decades