The Creole Archipelago

The Creole Archipelago

Author: Tessa Murphy

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812299977

Category: History

Page: 352

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In The Creole Archipelago, Tessa Murphy traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans, and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge social, economic, and informal political connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean. Focusing on a chain of volcanic islands, each one visible from the next, whose societies developed outside the sphere of European rule until the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763, Murphy argues that the imperial frameworks typically used to analyze the early colonial Caribbean are at odds with the geographic realities that shaped daily life in the region. Through use of wide-ranging sources including historical maps, parish records, an Indigenous-language dictionary, and colonial correspondence housed in the Caribbean, France, England, and the United States, Murphy shows how this watery borderland became a center of broader imperial experimentation, contestation, and reform. British and French officials dispatched to Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Tobago after 1763 encountered a creolized society that repeatedly frustrated their attempts to transform the islands into productive plantation colonies. By centering the stories of Kalinagos who asserted continued claims to land, French Catholics who demanded the privileges of British subjects, and free people of African descent who insisted on their right to own land and enslaved people, Murphy offers a vivid counterpoint to larger Caribbean plantation societies like Jamaica and Barbados. By looking outward from the eastern Caribbean chain, The Creole Archipelago resituates small islands as microcosms of broader historical processes central to understanding early American and Atlantic history, including European usurpation of Indigenous lands, the rise of slavery and plantation production, and the creation and codification of racial difference.
The Creole Archipelago
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Tessa Murphy
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-08 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

In The Creole Archipelago, Tessa Murphy traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans, and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge social, economic, and informal political connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean. Focusing on a chain of volcanic islands, each one visible
The Indentured Archipelago
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Reshaad Durgahee
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-02-03 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A historical geographical comparison of the Indo-Pacific Indian indenture labour experience, revealing the hitherto unexplored movements of labourers between colonies.
Little India
Language: en
Pages: 345
Authors: Patrick Eisenlohr
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

Examining an example of linguistic plurality on the island of Mauritius, where more than two-thirds of the population is of Indian ancestry, this study focuses on the formation of diaspora as mediated through the cultural phenomenon of Indian ancestral languages - principally Hindi, which is used in religious contexts.
The Creole Archipelago
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Tessa Murphy
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-08 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

By approaching the colonial Caribbean as an interconnected region, Tessa Murphy recasts small islands as the site of broader contests over Indigenous dominion, racial belonging, economic development, and colonial subjecthood.
Caribbean Globalizations, 1492 to the Present Day
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Eva Sansavior, Richard Scholar
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-03-02 - Publisher: Liverpool University Press

Caribbean Globalizations explores the relations between globalization and the Caribbean since 1492, when Columbus first arrived in the region, to the present day.