The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings

The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings

Author: Marc Kushner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476784922

Category: Architecture

Page: 152

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The founder of Architizer.com and practicing architect draws on his unique position at the crossroads of architecture and social media to highlight 100 important buildings that embody the future of architecture. We’re asking more of architecture than ever before; the response will define our future. A pavilion made from paper. A building that eats smog. An inflatable concert hall. A research lab that can walk through snow. We’re entering a new age in architecture—one where we expect our buildings to deliver far more than just shelter. We want buildings that inspire us while helping the environment; buildings that delight our senses while serving the needs of a community; buildings made possible both by new technology and repurposed materials. Like an architectural cabinet of wonders, this book collects the most innovative buildings of today and tomorrow. The buildings hail from all seven continents (to say nothing of other planets), offering a truly global perspective on what lies ahead. Each page captures the soaring confidence, the thoughtful intelligence, the space-age wonder, and at times the sheer whimsy of the world’s most inspired buildings—and the questions they provoke: Can a building breathe? Can a skyscraper be built in a day? Can we 3D-print a house? Can we live on the moon? Filled with gorgeous imagery and witty insight, this book is an essential and delightful guide to the future being built around us—a future that matters more, and to more of us, than ever.
The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings
Language: en
Pages: 152
Authors: Marc Kushner
Categories: Architecture
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-03-10 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

The founder of Architizer.com and practicing architect draws on his unique position at the crossroads of architecture and social media to highlight 100 important buildings that embody the future of architecture. We’re asking more of architecture than ever before; the response will define our future. A pavilion made from paper.
Masters of the Structural Aesthetic
Language: en
Pages: 132
Authors: Derek Thomas
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-05 - Publisher: Springer

This book highlights aesthetics as pertaining to the structural component in architectural design. This less explored aspect of architecture is discussed and explains the enduring qualities of ten specific buildings from architectural history to present day due to their structural aesthetics. Based on comprehensive research, a critical analysis is presented
The Art of Stillness
Language: en
Pages: 96
Authors: Pico Iyer
Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-11-04 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

A follow up to Pico Iyer’s essay “The Joy of Quiet,” The Art of Stillness considers the unexpected adventure of staying put and reveals a counterintuitive truth: The more ways we have to connect, the more we seem desperate to unplug. Why might a lifelong traveler like Pico Iyer, who
Follow Your Gut
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Rob Knight
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-04-07 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Allergies, asthma, obesity, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and someday cured—by the microscopic life inside us. The key is to understand how this groundbreaking science influences your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic
Architecture and Freedom
Language: en
Pages: 136
Authors: Rob Knight
Categories: Architecture
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-04-09 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Architects are facing a crisis of agency. For decades, they have seen their traditional role diminish in scope as more and more of their responsibilities have been taken over by other disciplines within the building construction industry. Once upon a time, we might have seen the architect as the conductor