The Myth of the Paperless Office

The Myth of the Paperless Office

Author: Abigail J. Sellen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262250498

Category: Computers

Page: 245

View: 142

Download Now
An examination of why paper continues to fill our offices and a proposal for better coordination of the paper and digital worlds. Over the past thirty years, many people have proclaimed the imminent arrival of the paperless office. Yet even the World Wide Web, which allows almost any computer to read and display another computer's documents, has increased the amount of printing done. The use of e-mail in an organization causes an average 40 percent increase in paper consumption. In The Myth of the Paperless Office, Abigail Sellen and Richard Harper use the study of paper as a way to understand the work that people do and the reasons they do it the way they do. Using the tools of ethnography and cognitive psychology, they look at paper use from the level of the individual up to that of organizational culture. Central to Sellen and Harper's investigation is the concept of "affordances"—the activities that an object allows, or affords. The physical properties of paper (its being thin, light, porous, opaque, and flexible) afford the human actions of grasping, carrying, folding, writing, and so on. The concept of affordance allows them to compare the affordances of paper with those of existing digital devices. They can then ask what kinds of devices or systems would make new kinds of activities possible or better support current activities. The authors argue that paper will continue to play an important role in office life. Rather than pursue the ideal of the paperless office, we should work toward a future in which paper and electronic document tools work in concert and organizational processes make optimal use of both.
The Myth of the Paperless Office
Language: en
Pages: 245
Authors: Abigail J. Sellen, Richard H. R. Harper
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-02-28 - Publisher: MIT Press

An examination of why paper continues to fill our offices and a proposal for better coordination of the paper and digital worlds. Over the past thirty years, many people have proclaimed the imminent arrival of the paperless office. Yet even the World Wide Web, which allows almost any computer to
Posthumanism and the Digital University
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Lesley Gourlay
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-10 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

It is a commonplace in educational policy and theory to claim that digital technology has 'transformed' the university, the nature of learning and even the essence of what it means to be a scholar or a student. However, these claims have not always been based on strong research evidence. What
Tailoring Software Infrastructures
Language: en
Pages: 188
Authors: Christian Dörner
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

Today's non-tayloristic work environments call for flexible work practices supported by dynamic IT systems. Changing and optimising business processes has become an important 'adaptation mechanism' in this context. However, process models cannot capture every conceivable real-life situation, and firms' software infrastructures often do not provide the flexibility required for supporting
The Myth of Resource Efficiency
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: John M. Polimeni, Kozo Mayumi, Mario Giampietro, Blake Alcott
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-08 - Publisher: Routledge

'The Jevons Paradox', which was first expressed in 1865 by William Stanley Jevons in relation to use of coal, states that an increase in efficiency in using a resource leads to increased use of that resource rather than to a reduction. This has subsequently been proved to apply not just
Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-computer Interaction
Language: en
Pages: 958
Authors: William Sims Bainbridge
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Berkshire Publishing Group LLC

Presents a collection of articles on human-computer interaction, covering such topics as applications, methods, hardware, and computers and society.