The Peace Progressives and American Foreign Relations

The Peace Progressives and American Foreign Relations

Author: Robert David Johnson

Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674659171

Category: History

Page: 448

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This intensively researched volume covers a previously neglected aspect of American history: the foreign policy perspective of the peace progressives, a bloc of dissenters in the U.S. Senate, between 1913 and 1935. The Peace Progressives and American Foreign Relations is the first full-length work to focus on these senators during the peak of their collective influence. Robert David Johnson shows that in formulating an anti-imperialist policy, the peace progressives advanced the left-wing alternative to the Wilsonian agenda. The experience of World War I, and in particular Wilson's postwar peace settlement, unified the group behind the idea that the United States should play an active world role as the champion of weaker states. Senators Asle Gronna of North Dakota, Robert La Follette and John Blaine of Wisconsin, and William Borah of Idaho, among others, argued that this anti-imperialist vision would reconcile American ideals not only with the country's foreign policy obligations but also with American economic interests. In applying this ideology to both inter-American and European affairs, the peace progressives emerged as the most powerful opposition to the business-oriented internationalism of the decade's Republican administrations, while formulating one of the most comprehensive critiques of American foreign policy ever to emerge from Congress.
The Peace Progressives and American Foreign Relations
Language: en
Pages: 448
Authors: Robert David Johnson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995 - Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press

This intensively researched volume covers a previously neglected aspect of American history: the foreign policy perspective of the peace progressives, a bloc of dissenters in the U.S. Senate, between 1913 and 1935. The Peace Progressives and American Foreign Relations is the first full-length work to focus on these senators during
Congress and the Cold War
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Robert David Johnson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-11-21 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The first historical interpretation of the congressional response to the entire Cold War. Using a wide variety of sources, including several manuscript collections opened specifically for this study, the book challenges the popular and scholarly image of a weak Cold War Congress, in which the unbalanced relationship between the legislative
A Companion to American Foreign Relations
Language: en
Pages: 576
Authors: Robert Schulzinger
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-04-15 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

This is an authoritative volume of historiographical essays that survey the state of U.S. diplomatic history. The essays cover the entire range of the history of American foreign relations from the colonial period to the present. They discuss the major sources and analyze the most influential books and articles in
Progressivism and US Foreign Policy between the World Wars
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Molly Cochran, Cornelia Navari
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-14 - Publisher: Springer

This book considers eleven key thinkers on American foreign policy during the inter-war period. All put forward systematic proposals for the direction, aims and instruments of American foreign policy; all were listened to, in varying degrees, by the policy makers of the day; all were influential in policy terms, as
Congress and the Cold War
Language: en
Pages: 380
Authors: Robert David Johnson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-11-21 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This book challenges the popular and scholarly image of a weak Cold War Congress, in which the unbalanced relationship between the legislative and executive branches culminated in the escalation of the U.S. commitment in Vietnam, paving the way for the passage of the War Powers Act in 1973. It evokes