Vietnamerica

Vietnamerica

Author: GB Tran

Publisher: Ballantine Group

ISBN: 9780345544490

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 288

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A superb new graphic memoir in which an inspired artist/storyteller reveals the road that brought his family to where they are today: Vietnamerica GB Tran is a young Vietnamese American artist who grew up distant from (and largely indifferent to) his family’s history. Born and raised in South Carolina as a son of immigrants, he knew that his parents had fled Vietnam during the fall of Saigon. But even as they struggled to adapt to life in America, they preferred to forget the past—and to focus on their children’s future. It was only in his late twenties that GB began to learn their extraordinary story. When his last surviving grandparents die within months of each other, GB visits Vietnam for the first time and begins to learn the tragic history of his family, and of the homeland they left behind. In this family saga played out in the shadow of history, GB uncovers the root of his father’s remoteness and why his mother had remained in an often fractious marriage; why his grandfather had abandoned his own family to fight for the Viet Cong; why his grandmother had had an affair with a French soldier. GB learns that his parents had taken harrowing flight from Saigon during the final hours of the war not because they thought America was better but because they were afraid of what would happen if they stayed. They entered America—a foreign land they couldn’t even imagine—where family connections dissolved and shared history was lost within a span of a single generation. In telling his family’s story, GB finds his own place in this saga of hardship and heroism. Vietnamerica is a visually stunning portrait of survival, escape, and reinvention—and of the gift of the American immigrants’ dream, passed on to their children. Vietnamerica is an unforgettable story of family revelation and reconnection—and a new graphic-memoir classic.
Vietnamerica
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: GB Tran
Categories: Comics & Graphic Novels
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-01 - Publisher: Ballantine Group

A superb new graphic memoir in which an inspired artist/storyteller reveals the road that brought his family to where they are today: Vietnamerica GB Tran is a young Vietnamese American artist who grew up distant from (and largely indifferent to) his family’s history. Born and raised in South Carolina as
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Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Sonia Weiner
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-05-03 - Publisher: BRILL

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Language: en
Pages: 370
Authors: Martha J. Cutter, Cathy J. Schlund-Vials
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-04-01 - Publisher: University of Georgia Press

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Language: en
Pages: 372
Authors: Sabrina Thomas
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-12 - Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

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Language: en
Pages: 286
Authors: Joel P. Rhodes
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-15 - Publisher: University of Georgia Press

For American children raised exclusively in wartime—that is, a Cold War containing monolithic communism turned hot in the jungles of Southeast Asia—and the first to grow up with televised combat, Vietnam was predominately a mediated experience. Walter Cronkite was the voice of the conflict, and grim, nightly statistics the most